Island carvers stunning works tell the history of the community of Silver Water

Don Tenniswood stands alongside the two wood carving roadside memorial sculptures he recently completed. The stunning works tells the story of the community of Silver Water.

SILVER WATER—Stunning is the only way to describe two wood carving roadside memorial sculptures completed by a local carver that tells the story of the community of Silver Water.

“Local residents wanted something that would commemorate Canada’s 150th birthday this year and also tell the story of the community of Silver Water,” stated carver Don Tenniswood, who created the stunning images on the two large wood carvings.

Myra Duncanson brought forward the original idea in early February of this year to have Mr. Tenniswood create these works to showcase all the history of industry, groups and activities in Silver Water over the years.

Ms. Duncanson and Karen Noble discussed the concept with Murray Duncanson, who in turn brought the idea to the group at the Robinson Township fire department’s appreciation dinner held at Stop 540 on February 13. There was much discussion among community members who thought this was a great idea.

Don Tenniswood stands alongside the two wood carving roadside memorial sculptures he recently completed. The stunning works tells the story of the community of Silver Water.

The Local Services Board (LSB)  of Robinson held a public meeting on March 13, 2017 at the Silver Water Community Hall. Everyone present discussed the size of the carvings, where they would be located, what kind of trees would be required, how much time would be taken to complete the works, and what pictures would be carved on the trees.

The LSB passed a  motion to request Mr. Tenniswood create two large wood carvings to include: fishing, hunting, farming, fur trade, logging, trucking, limestone quarry, church, Women’s Institute, veterans, crafting, schools, the local fire team, snowmobiles, maple syrup production, gardening, the Silver Water Orchestra, and a feather was added to represent the many Native influences.

Mr. Tenniswood was at the LSB meeting and steered the group as to the necessary requirements to carry out the work. Rick Dufney provided the maple logs used and Doug Wismer delivered them to Mr. Tenniswood.

Mr. Tenniswood completed the works in the middle of May and had them painted a few days later.

“Each of the wood carvings is 10 feet six inches high,” said Mr. Tenniswood, who has been a carver for 20 years. “And  both are made of maple.”

Mr. Tenniswood took two  months to complete his work and he explained once he had been given a list of the items the community wanted carved onto the trees he took to the computer to do research of the things represented, take pictures and then carve them into the maple trees. “We have Hercules loading limestone as one of the things I carved,” he told the Recorder. “There is a lot of commercial and recreational fishing in the area and this is shown in my carving. I had approached Reverend Janice Frame on carving praying hands, with the bible and cross and she was in support of this being included.” Logging is depicted, with the roots running deep like the community, the Women’s Institute logo, hunting and fishing, musical instruments, snowmobiling and much, much more; in tremendous detail.

The Local Services Board of Robinson met at a public meeting on June 7 to install Mr. Tenniswood’s works at the Silver Water fire hall. This is to be complete by the end of June in time to reveal them on July 1, 2017.

SHARE